Trains in Sydney today: delays and cancellations after flooding

Transport nightmare as Sydney trains are delayed or canceled as track work continues and maintenance workers STRIKE after flooding

  • Train cancellations and delays are still happening on the NSW rail network
  • Delays caused by damage from last week’s storm that tore the state apart
  • Some trains still in circulation have been forced to reduce their speed to 40 km/h

Train cancellations and delays are still happening on the NSW rail network due to storm damage last week.

Transport for NSW says ‘crews are working around the clock to assess damage and carry out repairs after bad weather has caused significant damage’.

Sydney commuters are told to expect more delays and ‘service gaps and cancellations’ this week.

Cancellations have limited the number of services arriving at stations, resulting in the limited trains that have arrived completely inundated with commuters

Images and photographs have surfaced online of crowds crammed into stations desperately waiting for their train to arrive.  Pictured: Parramatta Station

Images and photographs have surfaced online of crowds crammed into stations desperately waiting for their train to arrive. Pictured: Parramatta Station

Some trains still in circulation have been forced to slow down and only run at 40 km/h.

From 8.30am the North Shore line only runs between Hornsby and North Sydney and services operate at a reduced frequency between Hornsby and Central and Lidcombe and Olympic Park due to storm damage last week.

There could be further frustration for commuters on Sydney’s rail network today with another strike starting tomorrow.

The Electrical Trades Union has told Sydney Trains it will slow down critical maintenance and repair work.

Some maintenance work will be prohibited for workers. The Union of Railways, Trams and Buses also refused to do the job out of solidarity.

While not expected to cause immediate disruption, some warnings could cause network delays if the action drags on.

Sydney Trains chief executive Matt Longland said ongoing industrial action will mean “the network will eventually suffer”.

“There will be a point where equipment, such as substations, overhead wiring and track points cannot be used if these maintenance activities have not been carried out,” he told the newspaper. Daily Telegraph.

“If the bans continue indefinitely, this could gradually lead to safety issues on the rail network and the inability to operate increasing portions of the network.”

Sydney commuters are told to expect more delays and

Sydney commuters are told to expect more delays and ‘gaps in service and cancellations’ (pictured, large crowds formed in Erskineville on Saturday)

<a class=Transport Minister David Elliott said talks between industry groups were ongoing (pictured, crowds of commuters waiting for a train over the weekend)” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

Transport Minister David Elliott said talks between industry groups were ongoing (pictured, crowds of commuters waiting for a train over the weekend)

“At this time, we do not anticipate any impact to services for our customers next week.”

Transport Minister David Elliott said discussions between industry groups were ongoing.

“I will continue to meet (ETU) but I can’t help but be wary of the motives as we approach two elections,” he said.

Commuters were told last week to avoid train travel as flood damage affected the rail network.

Unprecedented rainfall in the port city caused major delays while flooding on the tracks prompted some trains to run slower than normal.

The New South Wales government said flooding, landslides and trees on the tracks were the main contributors to the delays.

About Jun Quentin

Check Also

Line reopens between Axminster and Pinhoe in Devon after landslide prevention work

After five days of work between Axminster and Pinhoe, Network Rail thanked passengers for their …