Latest news on Russia and the war in Ukraine

Airstrikes reported in several Ukrainian cities

Policemen stand guard in a street after a drone attack in Kyiv on October 17, 2022, amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images

Airstrikes were reported in several Ukrainian cities, prompting President Volodymyr Zelensky to accuse Russia of terrorizing and killing civilians.

Zelenskyy said via Telegram that one person was killed in a missile strike on a residential building in Mykolaiv, southern Ukraine.

“Ukraine is under fire from the occupiers. They continue to do what they do best – terrorizing and killing civilians,” Zelenskyy said, according to Reuters. “The terrorist state will not change anything for itself with such actions. It will only confirm its destructive and murderous essence, for which it will certainly be held responsible.”

Meanwhile, Maria Avdeeva, a Kharkiv security analyst, described the latest barrage of airstrikes as a “massive attack on energy infrastructure”.

Avdeeva reported three strikes against an energy facility in Kyiv’s Desnyansky district, two strikes against energy infrastructure in Dnipro in central Ukraine and no electricity or water supply in Zhytomyr in the north.

CNBC was unable to independently verify this report.

—Sam Meredith

Zelenskyy urges Ukrainian forces to take more Russian prisoners

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has called on the country’s forces to take more Russian prisoners to help release more Ukrainian troops.

His comments come shortly after Kyiv and Moscow conducted the largest POW exchange to date, swapping a total of 218 detainees, including 108 Ukrainian women.

“I am grateful to everyone involved for this success, and I also thank everyone who replenishes our exchange fund, who ensures the capture of enemies,” Zelenskyy said during his evening address to the nation.

“The more Russian prisoners we have, the sooner we can free our heroes. Every Ukrainian warrior, every frontline commander should remember that,” he added.

—Sam Meredith

Death toll in Russian plane crash rises to 13

A senior Russian health official said 13 people were killed after a Russian fighter jet crashed into a nine-story residential building in the southern Russian city of Yeysk, according to the Russian news agency Interfax.

Videos and images posted on social media on Monday showed a large ball of fire coming out of a residential building in the resort town, near the border with Ukraine.

Alexei Kuznetsov, Russia’s deputy health minister, told the news agency that 13 people had died as a result of the accident, including three children.

—Sam Meredith

EU approves training mission in Ukraine and arms funds

European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Josep Borrell speaks during a press conference with European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen after Russia launched a massive military operation against Ukraine, in Brussels, Belgium, on February 27, 2022.

Stephanie Lecocq | Reuters

The European Union has approved a military training mission in Europe for thousands of Ukrainian soldiers and provided around 500 million euros ($486 million) in additional funds to help buy weapons for the war-torn country. war.

The mission, which will have headquarters in Brussels and be under the command of French naval officer Vice-Admiral Hervé Bléjean, will initially last two years with a budget of nearly 107 million euros ($104 million).

EU headquarters said in a statement that the objective of the mission is to enable the Ukrainian Armed Forces to “effectively carry out military operations”, so that Ukraine can “defend its territorial integrity within internationally recognized borders, effectively exercise sovereignty and protect civilians”.

He said the EU will provide “individual, collective and specialized training”. Countries that are not part of the bloc will be allowed to participate in the training effort. The initial goal is to train around 15,000 Ukrainian soldiers, mainly in Poland and Germany.

— Associated Press

War in Russia pushes 4 million more children into poverty, says UNICEF

A child waits on the train to Poland at the central station on April 11, 2022 in Lviv, Ukraine.

Joe Raedle | Getty Images

Russia’s months-long war in Ukraine, coupled with rising inflation, has pushed more children around the world into poverty, according to a new UNICEF report.

UNICEF, the United Nations International Children’s Fund, says four million more children in Eastern Europe and Central Asia have been pushed into poverty, a 19% increase since 2021.

“Beyond the obvious horrors of war – killing and maiming of children, mass displacement – ​​the economic consequences of war in Ukraine are having a devastating impact on children in Eastern Europe and Central Asia,” said Afshan Khan, UNICEF Regional Director for Europe. and Central Asia.

“Children across the region are being swept away in the terrible wake of this war. If we don’t support these children and families now, the sharp rise in child poverty will almost certainly lead to lost lives, lost learnings and lost futures. lost,” Khan added.

—Amanda Macias

Kyiv and Moscow carry out largest exchange of prisoners of war to date

This photo taken by Ukrainian Presidential Chief of Staff Andriy Yermak on October 17, 2022 shows released Ukrainian female prisoners posing for a photo after their exchange at an unknown location in Ukraine. Ukraine announced it had exchanged more than 100 prisoners with Russia in what it said was the first all-female exchange with Moscow after nearly eight months of war.

Str | AFP | Getty Images

Moscow and Kyiv carried out one of the largest prisoner of war swaps so far, swapping a total of 218 detainees, including 108 Ukrainian women, officials from both sides said.

Andriy Yermak, chief of staff to the Ukrainian president, said there were 12 civilians among the released women.

“It was the first all-female exchange,” he wrote on the Telegram messaging app, adding that 37 of the women were captured after Russian forces took over the giant Azovstal steelworks in the city. port of Mariupol in May.

Separately, Ukraine’s Interior Ministry said some of the women had been in jail since 2019 after being detained by pro-Moscow authorities in the eastern regions. Earlier, the Russian-appointed head of one of the regions said Kyiv was releasing 80 civilian sailors and 30 military personnel.

Ukrainian prisoners of war walk after an exchange, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, at an unknown location, Ukraine on October 17, 2022.

Andriy Yermak | Ukrainian Presidential Office via Telegram | via Reuters

Ukrainian POWs look out of a bus window, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, as they arrive in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, October 17, 2022.

Stringer | Reuters

Ukrainian prisoners of war (POW) react, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, as they arrive in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, October 17, 2022.

Ukrainian Presidential Press Service | via Reuters

A Ukrainian prisoner of war (POW) reacts, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, as she arrives in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, October 17, 2022.

Ukrainian Presidential Press Service | via Reuters

A Ukrainian prisoner of war (POW) reacts, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, as she arrives in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, October 17, 2022.

Stringer | Reuters

A Ukrainian prisoner of war (POW) reacts, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, as she arrives in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, October 17, 2022.

Ukrainian Presidential Press Service | via Reuters

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